Cure Outcomes: Publications
Bacteriophage Deficiency Characterizes Respiratory Virome Dysbiosis in Childhood Asthma

On August 4th 2020, the first paper was released in pre-publication form, revealing an association between changes in respiratory microbiome and the disease state of asthma. 

The results show that preschool children with asthma have reduced levels of bacteriophages in their airways compared to their non-asthmatic counterparts. Given that bacteriophages are important regulators of the microbiome, their underrepresentation may lead to an ecological imbalance of the respiratory tract, comprising the resilience of the respiratory system towards asthma exacerbations. At the same time, the level of certain viruses is higher in asthma patients, increasing the chances of a symptomatic infection or sustained inflammation.

The publication is available here.

Interactions of Bacteriophages and
Bacteria at the Airway Mucosa:
New Insights into the Pathophysiology of Asthma

On January 26th 2021, a focused review from CURE was published.

Recent studies indicate that the microbial composition of asthmatic airways, across the spectrum of disease severity, differ significantly compared to healthy individuals. The levels of bacteriophages differ too, since people with asthma have a lower level of bacteriophages compared with non-asthmatic individuals.

The CURE publication reviewed the importance of the interaction between phages, bacteria, and respiratory epithelium, in asthma pathogenicity and development. The relationship between airway epithelial cells, bacterial symbionts and resident bacteriophages should be considered as a functional and interdependent unit with direct implications for the respiratory system and overall homeostasis. While the role of epithelial cells in asthma pathophysiology is well-established, this tripartite interaction should be scrutinized, both to better understand asthma as a system disorder and to explore potential interventions.

The publication is available here.